* Reminder * EER 9 on ‘Inclusive early childhood development and education’ now available

Don’t forget to have a look at our latest edition of Enabling Education Review. The articles cover a diverse selection of examples of making early childhood education and development more inclusive for all young learners.

Featured countries include:

England, Eswatini, Kenya, Malawi, Morocco, Nigeria, Rwanda, Uganda, Vietnam, and Zambia.

Read EER9 in HTML format or in PDF format.

Call for Articles: Enabling Education Review Issue 10, 2021

Over the last year we have all found ourselves in an unusual situation. Our theme for the next edition therefore draws on the work being done to support children’s learning as we have adapted to the COVID-19 pandemic and school closures. It will also look at the broader context of what it means to learn at home.

The theme for the 2021 edition of Enabling Education Review will be:

“Home learning”

The deadline for submitting first drafts of articles is 31 March 2021. Details of suggested topics and how to submit articles are provided in the full call for articles.

Call for Articles (Arabic).

Contact info@eenet.org.uk with any questions.

Call for Articles: Enabling Education Review, Issue 10, 2021

Over the last year we have all found ourselves in an unusual situation. Our theme for the next edition therefore draws on the work being done to support children’s learning as we have adapted to the COVID-19 pandemic and school closures. It will also look at the broader context of what it means to learn at home.

The theme for the 2021 edition of Enabling Education Review will be:

 “Home learning”

The deadline for submitting first drafts of articles is 31 March 2021. *EXTENSION – new deadline now 30 April 2021*

Details of suggested topics and how to submit articles are provided below.

Contact info@eenet.org.uk with any questions.

 

Why have we chosen this topic?

Many children learned at home before the COVID-19 pandemic for various reasons. For example, they may have been denied access to school, or their parents may have chosen home schooling as their preferred approach. Plus of course most children experience a great deal of informal learning at home, even if they also go to school.

Learning at home has often been seen as separate from mainstream education and not part of the movement towards inclusive education. EENET has always argued that, with the right strategies, approaches and support in place, learning at home can be considered an integral contribution to an inclusive education system.

Over the last year, COVID-19 school closures meant millions of children suddenly had to learn at home, and their teachers and education ministries had to work out how to facilitate that. One of the biggest challenges has been ensuring that learning at home is inclusive of every learner.

In early 2020 EENET, through our partnership with Norwegian Association of Disabled, launched a project to explore home learning and the education experiences of stakeholders during the widespread lockdowns. Using evidence from a survey, we developed a home learning guidance poster and booklet for families. These resources recognise that home education can be extremely stressful for learners and families, especially in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. They also show that home learning is always relevant, whether or not schools are open, and we can do more to weave effective learning at home into high quality inclusive education systems.

What has been your experience as a teacher, parent, family member, learner, or other stakeholder involved in education? Was home learning a new experience for you during the pandemic, or is it something you have been involved with for a long time? How do you cope with or support learning at home? What works well and what is challenging? What support did or do you receive, or would you like to receive?

 

What could you write about?

There are many aspects of home learning that you could write about, including but not limited to:

  • What has been done to ensure emergency-response or long-term home learning initiatives promote inclusion and are inclusive for all learners?
  • How are inclusive home learning initiatives financed and managed?
  • As a parent/caregiver/learner – how have you advocated at the local or national level for home learning provision to be more inclusive.
  • As a teacher – what did you do to reach and support all your learners when schools were closed? What problems did you solve to help you reach and support more/all learners? Who helped you?
  • For learners who were already learning at home before the pandemic, how has their home learning been affected (positively or negatively) by the changes in the education system resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic?
  • How have approaches to learning changed as a result of responsibility for learning shifting heavily onto parents and families for prolonged periods?
  • How does home learning affect the mental and physical well-being of learners, parents, families, and teachers?
  • What lessons have we learned from the COVID-19 home learning experiences that we could use to improve the design and inclusivity of education systems long term?

Enabling Education Review helps people share and learn from each other’s experiences. We therefore welcome articles that offer practical insights, to help others who are looking for ideas that they can adapt and try. We like articles that provide a little background to the context, project or programme, and then explain in more detail the activities that happened (what, where, when, with or by whom, and why). We also like to read about the results, if possible.

For more information on how you can submit an article please download the full call for articles.

Call for Articles (Arabic).

Youth webinar series on the futures of education, UNESCO, 11 and 19 March 2021

This webinar series, co-organized with the Office of the Secretary-General’s Envoy on Youth, addresses broad questions around young people’s views on the possible and fundamental transformations in how societies, politics, economies and cultures may be organized in the future, and more specifically, how education systems and schooling may look like.

 

Technology and the futures of education

This webinar will discuss the different ways technology can help advance the sustainable development agenda and particularly education, aiming to contribute to more equitable and inclusive education systems

Date: Thursday, 11 March, 15:00-16:30 Paris time.

Register online.

 

The futures of education for persons with disabilities

This webinar will discuss effective practices and inclusive policies for learners with disabilities and learning difficulties, exchange experiences, and identify necessary transformations for education systems in the future

Date: Friday, 19 March, 15:00-16:30 Paris time.

Register online.

Global Technical Lead – Inclusive Teaching and Learning, Sightsavers

Location: UK / flexible.

Application deadline: 14 March 2021.

Read the full job details.

Sightsavers is looking for a Global Technical Lead, Inclusive Teaching and Learning with disability expertise to promote inclusive teaching and learning for children, youth, and adults with disabilities in education systems in West Africa, East, Central and Southern Africa (ECSA), and South Asia.

Consultancy to write inclusive education proposal, Bangladesh, Humanity & Inclusion

Read the full terms of reference.

USAID is expected to release a call for proposals for an inclusive education project (Shobai Miley Pori :“Everyone Reads Together”). A Humanity and Inclusion-led consortium seeks to hire a consultant to support the proposal writing process based on Shobai Miley Pori anticipated priorities and building upon partners previous experience.

It is anticipated this consultancy will require 15 days of work before the end of February 2021.

Read the full terms of reference.

Chief of Party (Reading for All – Inclusive Education Program), Nepal, Humanity & Inclusion

Location: Kathmandu with frequent field visits.

Duration: 18 months.

Application deadline: 27 January 2021.

Read the full job details (Word document).

 

HI is leading the inclusive education project – Reading For All (with support of USAID in Nepal) implemented in a consortium. This project is testing inclusive education models for improving reading skills for children with disabilities from Grades 1 to 3, with the Nepal Government in 10 Districts. The aim is to scale it up for the National Early Grade Reading Programme of the Nepal Government.  The project has started in May 2018 and will end in September 2022; the overall budget is USD 5.500.000

To carry out of this project, HI Nepal is looking for an Inclusive Education Chief of Party for 18 months

Under the line management of the Operations Manager, the Chief of Party will serve as the primary point of contact with USAID/Nepal. They will be responsible for the overall implementation of this inclusive education project, including financial and operational management.

Read the full job details (Word document).

Report: Leave No Child Behind. Invest in the early years

This report provides an overview and findings on the state of inclusive early childhood development (ECD) in sub-Saharan Africa, the region with the highest proportion of children at risk of not meeting their developmental milestones.

The research focused on 4 countries in sub-Saharan Africa: Burkina Faso, Mozambique, Zambia, Zimbabwe. Ten donors were analysed in terms of their investment in early childhood development: Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, United States; European Union, Global Partnership for Education, World Bank, UNICEF.

Download Leave No Child Behind. Invest in the early years.

World Bank report on education for learners with disabilities in the COVID-19 context

COVID-19 requires a rethink of remote learning to ensure inclusion. Every child with and without disability needs to access and participate in learning that takes place within and away from the classroom.

Read more in the new World Bank report: Pivoting to Inclusion: Leveraging Lessons from the COVID-19 Crisis for Learners with Disabilities.